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Hat |hat|
noun
shaped covering for the head worn for warmth, as a fashion item, or as part of a uniform.• used to refer to a particular role or occupation of someone who has more than one : wearing her scientific hat, she is director of a pharmacology research group.
PHRASES
hat in hand used to indicate an attitude of humility : standing on the stoop of his ex-wife’s house, hat in hand.
keep something under one’s hat keep something a secret.
pass the hat collect contributions of money from a number of people for a specific purpose.
pick something out of a hat select something, esp. the winner of a contest, at random.
take one’s hat off to (or hats off to) used to state one’s admiration for (someone who has done something praiseworthy) : I take my hat off to anyone who makes it work
hats off to emergency services for prompt work in the wake of the storms.
talk through one’s hat see talk .
throw one’s hat in (or into) the ring express willingness to take up a challenge, esp. to enter a political race.
DERIVATIVES
hatful |-ˌfoŏl| noun ( pl. -fuls.)
hatted adjective : [in combination ] a white-hatted cowboy.
ORIGIN Old English hætt, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse hҩttr ‘hood,’ also to hood.

—New Oxford American Dictionary

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Beanie |ˈbēnē|

noun ( pl. -ies)
a small, close-fitting hat worn on the back of the head.
ORIGIN 1940s: perhaps from bean (in the sense ‘head’ ) + -ie .

(Dictionary)

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Hat (engl.) = Mütze (german), die |Mütze|
“die Mütze; Genitiv: der Mütze, Plural: die Mützen
spätmittelhochdeutsch mutze, mütze, mittelhochdeutsch almuʒ, armuʒ < mittellateinisch almutium, almutia = Umhang um Schultern und Kopf des Geistlichen, Herkunft ungeklärt
Kopfbedeckung aus weichem Material (meist Wolle oder Baumwolle), die man bei kaltem Wetter trägt
eine schicke Mütze | die Mütze aufsetzen | eine Mütze tragen | zum Gruß die Mütze ziehen
eine Mütze [voll] Schlaf umgangssprachlich ein wenig Schlaf, ein Schläfchen
etwas/eins auf die Mütze bekommen/kriegen umgangssprachlich; Deckel” (Duden aus: Wissensnetz deutsche Sprache)

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